10 Best Crow Call For Turkey Hunting

Updated on: September 2022

Best Crow Call For Turkey Hunting in 2022


Primos Crow Call

Primos Crow Call
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2022

Hunters Specialties H.S. Strut Hammerin Crow Turkey Locator Call

Hunters Specialties H.S. Strut Hammerin Crow Turkey Locator Call
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2022
  • The Hunter Specialties Hammerin Crow Call Rootbeer distress cries and fighting call.
  • Weather resistant
  • Raspier sounding reed
  • Great for long range calling
  • Proven in the field

Faulk's C-50 Walnut Crow Call

Faulk's C-50 Walnut Crow Call
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2022
  • Excellent tone for adult crows
  • Faulk's Crow Call (C-50)
  • Made of walnut wood
  • Apply slight pressure on tips to get tone of young crows

Hunters Specialties H.S. Strut Loco Crow Call

Hunters Specialties H.S. Strut Loco Crow Call
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2022
  • Custom design and value priced
  • Custom design and value priced
  • Custom design and value priced
  • Gobblers will boom in response to these attention grabbing crow sounds
  • Now with an ergonomic barrel design that fits comfortably in your hand

Flextone Lightning Crow Call

Flextone Lightning Crow Call
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2022
  • Extreme long range volume
  • Soft body for natural realistic sounds
  • Works for locating turkeys or calling crows

Primos Power Crow Call

Primos Power Crow Call
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2022
  • 100 percent designed and tested for the toughest situations and environments
  • oudest locator available
  • Can be used as a turkey locator call or a crow hunting call

Woodhaven The Real Crow Turkey Call

Woodhaven The Real Crow Turkey Call
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2022
  • Hand turned birch barrel
  • Tuned with proper reed and mouth pieces
  • Produces the most realistic crow sounds
  • Easy to use
  • Durable

Primos PS375 Classic Crow

Primos PS375 Classic Crow
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2022
  • Hunting game calls turkey
  • Made of the highest quality materials
  • Another great Primos product

Primos Hunting Power Owl Turkey Locator Call

Primos Hunting Power Owl Turkey Locator Call
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2022
  • Quality materials used for all primos products
  • 100 percent designed and tested for the toughest situations and environments
  • Whether you are a professional, recreational user, or even casual, primos will fit the mold for all types of people
  • Design allows for super-loud locating
  • Improved design keeps reeds from sticking due to over blowing
  • Allows for automatic back pressure

Hunters Specialties H.S. Strut Super Strut Combo Kit

Hunters Specialties H.S. Strut Super Strut Combo Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2022
  • Made of highest quality material
  • Manufacturer: Hunters Specialties
  • Hunters Specialties Super strut pan call

Hunting Farmland Crows

If you are looking to improve your wing-shooting, develop new hunting grounds or just get out of the house and try something different. You may find that crow hunting is for you.

The first crow comes into view; I cram the call in my mouth and salute him. The steam clears off my glasses as he comes into gun range. The bird sets his wings and starts to descend into the spread. He senses something is wrong, and back paddles. He stands stationary for a split second, at that moment I deliver a payload of #7 1/2s and he folds. A small group sees their comrade descend into the decoy spread as they crest the tree line. Unaware or their comrades ill fortune, they assume he has found a breakfast buffet. In they come, I let the lead bird flare and he crosses in front of my son's blind. We shoot simultaneously each dumping a bird. The third bird tries desperately to get out of range, but is chased down by a swarm of shot to which we each contributed.

This continues for a couple hours, finally the action slows and I remember the apple I stuffed in my pocket at 4:30 that morning. I take a few bites and compliment my son on his shooting, as I take a sip of ice cold coffee from the travel mug I abandoned at daybreak. Now the frenzied pace of first light subsides. The shooting is more relaxed with birds still feeding steadily in. We shoot for a couple more hours and the pace really begins to slow down. Around 11 am we pack in our decoys, pick up spent shells, and also pick up the dead crows at the land owners request.

This particular morning yielded 60 crows. This has become a pretty typical morning of crow hunting for me. With my best days pushing over 125 birds and the occasional flop where only a 10 or 12 birds are taken. Even a slow day still yields some trigger time. How many water-fowl hunters consider a 10 or 12 bird day a flop?

Hunting crows has become a great source of enjoyment for me, my son and a few friends during the fall and late winter. I started hunting crows at the request of my grandfather. He is a farmer and became quite disgusted with the damage they inflicted on his grain crops. I did some research and started hunting them with decoys. Of course it is common knowledge they will go after an owl decoy, but I found much more consistent methods of luring them to the gun. The first thing I do is find a place they want to be. If I spot a field that is covered with crows, I will stop and ask permission of the landowner to hunt there. I have found that crows have few allies in rural America. I have almost never been turned down to shoot up a flock of crows. I will generally walk the field a day before the hunt and identify cover where I can hide. I try to utilize natural cover. My preference is standing corns if available, go in 2 rows, break a few stalks, instant crow blind. In the absence of standing corn, a hedgerow is usually available. I often carry a pole saw and cut a few overhead breaches and use the trimmings to bank up in front of myself. My last choice is to sit in the edge of woods overlooking a field. If a field is heavy with birds and that is all that is available, I will take it, but the shooting will be much tougher and the days tally will suffer.

I like to get on a field before daylight and set out a spread of crow decoys. Crows tend to be in small groups early in the day. Hunts that start later in the day tends to attract large flocks of crows. The problem with a large flock is that you may kill only one, or even a few birds, but the rest will learn from the experience. I prefer a steadier feed of small groups. If your shooting is on, a high percentage of birds that lay eyes on the spread should end up joining it.

I have a combination of full bodied plastic decoys and homemade silhouettes. The idea is to make it look like a group of crows have hit the jackpot and are putting on the feedbag. This in itself will draw crows in. The next step is to learn to use a crow call. This will bring them closer and hold their attention longer. The best way to learn to call is imitate what you hear up until the shot. Giving them back the sounds they give you that will lure most birds into range. An electronic caller will add to your success, but I would try a few crow hunts without one and make sure it's for you before the investment.

As far as choice of gun, it's "run what you brung". Any shotgun will do. I would advise that some lore would have people believe that crows are armor plated and must collide with a volley of number 4's to penetrate their feathers. This is nonsense likely rooted in excuses for poor shooting. Crows are not much larger than doves or pigeons, and the pattern density of smaller shot will prevail. A load of 7ÃÃ'½'s or 8's will make a stone dead crow farther than most people can hit them. I also prefer the lighter shot for a margin of safety. You must consider the greater distance larger shot travels and the increased kinetic energy it carries at a distance.

I am careful not to over-hunt an area. Every other week is enough for a spot. If and area is over-hunted, the crows become educated and will start to avoids your spread. This has not been a problem, as there never seems to be a shortage of spots where crows are congregating in the fall. The other great thing about this approach is that it opens the door to new hunting spots. I have discovered some great turkey, deer and small game hunting spots as a result of crow hunting. Landowners are usually receptive to your return for other purposes if you respect their land. This means picking up and disposing of spent shells and dead crows, unless you are asked to do otherwise.

So stop wishing away the portion of fall before deer season, get out there and give crow hunting a try. It will make you a better wing shot, introduce you to some new people and hunting areas, and benefit the local farmers, song birds and small game. The steady action is also a great way to introduce a youngster to hunting and wing shooting.

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